Domain names put a friendly face on hard-to-remember numeric internet addresses. Every computer on the internet has a unique internet protocol (IP) number. A domain name represents one IP number or more. For example, the IP number for the domain name whitehouse.gov is 104.109.178.94. The whole purpose is to give users an easy-to-remember handle so that when sending an e-mail to, let's say, the President of the United States, you can type president@whitehouse.gov instead of the more unwieldy president@104.109.178.94.

Many registrars reserve the right to revoke your domain name for specific reasons, typically if you use the domain for illegal purposes or purposes deemed unacceptable (such as spamming). Many contracts contain a clause letting the registrar delete your domain name for no apparent reason. The implication, of course, is that the domain name is the registrar's, not yours.
Many online shops have the number 24 in them, to signify 24 hours a day – you may also be able to integrate numbers into your domain in a meaningful way to make them unique. Be careful though, because many cultures attach a lot of significance to certain numbers. Make sure that your number doesn't represent bad luck or other negative things in the country you're operating in.

The character set allowed in the Domain Name System is based on ASCII and does not allow the representation of names and words of many languages in their native scripts or alphabets. ICANN approved the Internationalized domain name (IDNA) system, which maps Unicode strings used in application user interfaces into the valid DNS character set by an encoding called Punycode. For example, københavn.eu is mapped to xn--kbenhavn-54a.eu. Many registries have adopted IDNA.

When you type google.com into your browser, the domain is split into parts by the “dot”, from right to left. The first part is “com”, so your computer checks the root zone file to see which registry manages the .com TLD. It then checks with this registry to see where the next part, “google”, points to. The registry returns the IP address 216.58.214.14, and your computer can then ask Google to send their homepage over.


Custom domain name and transfer features: The transfer of a website name is possible, but so is an original name created by a company. The complete process begins with the registrar, and then you’re qualified with a transfer change. The names use FQDN and DNS models to effect your transfer. The year you transfer with a vendor, your domain name and personal data are also collected. Finally, getting your URL lets you customize a website.
New domain registrations can be added to a new or existing Netfirms account. Each Netfirms account includes 1 free e-mail account (unless you upgrade to a hosting package). If you are looking to register multiple domains and want an e-mail account for each, you can either create a separate Netfirms account for each domain or upgrade a single Netfirms account to a hosting package.
NameCheap offers domain names to individuals and businesses, including a wide range of new TLDs that can draw further attention to your particular business segment. They also have a user-friendly control panel for buying domain names as well as offer hosting and tools for building your website. I personally used them to transfer over 25 domain names at once, and it took a few days and about three clicks. They're my go-to processor for names I'm just looking to hold.

1&1 makes buying your domain name simple. The more complicated part is on your end in figuring out what you want your domain to be named. Once you have figured out what you want your domain name to be, 1&1 helps you with the rest. When you purchase a domain with 1&1, the cost is inclusive all the registration fees and affiliated E-Mail accounts with 2 GB storage space. Choose a domain package you need, and the registration is free. It includes sub-domains, a control panel, E-Mail account and support. Furthermore you use the website builder provided to you by 1&1 to construct your own website around your new domain.
Who is in charge of all of these processes? Most countries manage a Network Information Center (NIC). An NIC is the main database that has all the information regarding what domain names have been registered and the IP address associated with each of those domains. The nonprofit organization the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is in charge of creating and managing the procedures for internet namespaces.

There is also what is called a ccTLD, or country code top-level domain. These are designed to signify sites located in or associated with certain countries or territories. Most of the ccTLDs actually don't have restrictions regarding who can register domain names. In fact, many ccTLDs are commonly misinterpreted as TLDs. For example, while .tv is commonly registered by television and media related websites, .tv is actually the ccTLD designated for the country Tuvalu. Domain hacks are also a popular use of both TLDs and ccTLDs. This involves creating a full word or phrase when combining the domain name with the TLD to create something your audience will easily remember. A popular example is using the .me ccTLD for Montenegro and combining it with "aweso" to create the domain aweso.me.


Most people assume a domain name ends in .com so if you buy a domain name with one of the other extensions (.net, .info, .org, etc.), you’ll have some extra work to get people to remember that your site has a different extension. Don’t automatically assume you should only buy domains with .com, though. Many sites have done quite well with other extensions. (Look at us!)
If you ever change your web host (the actual physical location of your website files), your domain name goes with you. Your regular visitors or customers who knew your site name as (say) www.thesitewizard.com would not have to be informed about a change of web address (also known as "URL"), since as far as they are concerned, the site is still at the same place. They would simply type your domain name and they'd be transparently brought to your new location.
Classic domain extensions work for both options, as well as country specific extensions to build up local relevance. nTLD domain names such as .design, .business, or the eye-catching .nyc are good, .business especially in the case of a website builder package. There's often confusion surrounding the nTLDs, and it's good to know that the TLDs that imply a geographical reference are classified as generic top level domains by Google. For those who opt for website builder packages, it may be worth registering more than one domain extension, especially the classic extensions such as .com, as many users will remember this one better than the nTLDs – if you own the .com version but prefer the nTLD, you can always set up domain forwarding to avoid competition from other websites.

The top ten was rounded out by #8 Ecig.co.uk ($6,613 at DomainLore.co.uk) and two more Sedo sales - #9 Wallace .co at $5,999 and #10 Poianabrasov.ro at $5,632. Sedo went on to sweep 16 of 20 chart entries overall. UnicDomains filled three spots with sales they made on the Above.com Marketplace with their marquee sale of #4 AR.ca ($25,000) joined by #12 (tie) Playground.ca ($5,000) and #20 BlackMarket.ca at $3,500. 
Absolutely. Owning 'yourname.com' (as well as related domains such as yourname.tech or yourname.me) is a great way to brand yourself and retain control over your name's online presence. With a personal domain name, you can set up a portfolio, blog, or hobby site that’s associated with your own personal life. You can also set up a custom email address like john@johnsmith.com allowing your visitors an easy and memorable way to reach you. So even if you have no immediate use for yourname.com, it's wise to register a personal domain to ensure that you (and not some stranger) control your name online.
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