General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will be enforced by the European Union (EU) on May 25th, 2018. The GDPR is a strict set of rules centered around customer privacy. Internet Corporation For Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) has released a temporary standard to comply with GDPR while it negotiates with GDPR. As of the 25th, Oracle will remove the contact information from it’s whois server to comply with the GDPR as a temporary measure until the full ICANN standard is released.


Under no circumstances should you pay more to transfer a name than to get a new one. Check what the transfer will require. Does the new service handle the task completely? Or do you have to go into your current registrar's site and change the technical details manually? Finally, check the transfer policy of the registrar before registering your domain name.

Many online shops have the number 24 in them, to signify 24 hours a day – you may also be able to integrate numbers into your domain in a meaningful way to make them unique. Be careful though, because many cultures attach a lot of significance to certain numbers. Make sure that your number doesn't represent bad luck or other negative things in the country you're operating in.
When done right, the domain trade is an enterprise that lends itself to particularly lucrative deals. The tactic is simple: domain names are purchased with the prospect of reselling them for a wide profit margin. But the trick of this trade lies in securing domains that may later be valuable to well-endowed buyers, such as a large company. We have laid out all the important facts and terms on the topic, including some of the highest sale prices on record for a publicly traded .com domain.

The character set allowed in the Domain Name System is based on ASCII and does not allow the representation of names and words of many languages in their native scripts or alphabets. ICANN approved the Internationalized domain name (IDNA) system, which maps Unicode strings used in application user interfaces into the valid DNS character set by an encoding called Punycode. For example, københavn.eu is mapped to xn--kbenhavn-54a.eu. Many registries have adopted IDNA.
If you are looking for a TLD other than those listed above, our DNS services support domains in almost every TLD, as long as the registry and your registrar will delegate the domain for our nameservers. Domain Transfers are a one-time fee, priced at the one (1) year rate for the appropriate Top Level Domain and include an automatic one-year extension of the domain's expiration upon completion of the transfer.

A handful of domains will have restrictions on them, which means you can only purchase them if you meet certain criteria or have authorization (some examples are .gov, .edu. and .mil). But most extensions are available to everyone. In fact, most country code Top Level Domains (ccTLDs) are available for anyone to purchase, even if you don’t reside in the country in question.
Domain name registration is a crucial decision for any entity planning to join the virtual arena. A domain name is an exclusive address of your website through which it is found by your target audience. The process of buying a domain name is called Domain Name Registration. As a domain registrar, BigRock has millions of domain name registrations to its credit.
The right to use a domain name is delegated by domain name registrars, which are accredited by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the organization charged with overseeing the name and number systems of the Internet. In addition to ICANN, each top-level domain (TLD) is maintained and serviced technically by an administrative organization operating a registry. A registry is responsible for maintaining the database of names registered within the TLD it administers. The registry receives registration information from each domain name registrar authorized to assign names in the corresponding TLD and publishes the information using a special service, the WHOIS protocol.

"We were in the naming process for the project and we were gravitating around the name assemble. Problem is, most major domains are taken for any variation of that name. But then we stumbled upon an article about new TLDs available for the year. We found .HAUS and immediately knew it was perfect. It was great to keep that assemble base name and then mash it up with that modern design oriented term like .HAUS. The response has been great! It’s always nice to have a unique name to help you stand out from the crowd.”


What’s easy to forget, though, is that Verisign have managed .com for the past 20 years without so much as a hiccup of disruption or downtime, and that there’s no guarantee that a more democratic or competitive process would have resulted in the 2 decades of .com stability that we’ve enjoyed. Internet governance is obviously important, but we should remember that the overwhelming majority of users don’t know or care what’s going on behind the scenes.
The dispute was over the innocently-named Site Finder Service, launched by Verisign in 2003. With traffic to every .com domain going through Verisign, the Site Finder Service redirected anyone accessing an unregistered domain (via a typo, for example) to a Verisign website with sponsored links. The company argued that this was more useful to Internet users than seeing a generic error page. Whatever their reasoning, this made Verisign the de-facto owner of every unregistered domain (what else does it mean to own a domain?), and skyrocketed them from 2,500th into the top 10 most visited websites. The best part? Verisign launched this without running it past anyone.
General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will be enforced by the European Union (EU) on May 25th, 2018. The GDPR is a strict set of rules centered around customer privacy. Internet Corporation For Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) has released a temporary standard to comply with GDPR while it negotiates with GDPR. As of the 25th, Oracle will remove the contact information from it’s whois server to comply with the GDPR as a temporary measure until the full ICANN standard is released.
Most people assume a domain name ends in .com so if you buy a domain name with one of the other extensions (.net, .info, .org, etc.), you’ll have some extra work to get people to remember that your site has a different extension. Don’t automatically assume you should only buy domains with .com, though. Many sites have done quite well with other extensions. (Look at us!)
In order to register any domain, you must provide certain personal information that you may not wish to be publically searchable in the Whois database. Signing up for WhoisGuard is a great way to keep your registration data private. WhoisGuard acts as a "shield" for your searchable information, displaying the address, phone number, and email of the domain registrar (Namecheap, e.g.) instead of your own. Keep in mind that WhoisGuard is an optional security add-on that must be renewed separately when you renew your domain.
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